You Set Them And Then Forget Them!

New Year’s Resolutions! Of course you do – so does almost everyone else!

Setting 2017 New Years ResolutionsHow soon are New Year’s Resolutions given up on?

The answer will be given shortly, first check out what are typically in the Top Ten List for Resolution setters:

  1. Lose Weight
  2. Eat Healthier
  3. Better Financial Decisions
  4. Quit Smoking
  5. Work Out More Often
  6. Spend More Time With My Family
  7. Spend More Time With My Close Friends
  8. Do More Exciting Things
  9. Find A Better Job
  10. Learn Something New

How soon are New Year’s Resolutions given up on?

Fast! Yes, the majority of New Year’s Resolutions are given up within the first two weeks after New Year’s Day. Each week more failed resolutions hop onto the bus ride to nowhere. By the end of the first month – what resolutions?  Ask people after two months what their New Year’s Resolutions were and many will not even be able to recall what theirs were!

Why does this take place every single year without fail?  Do you need proof?

Ask anyone in the fitness club industry.  The first week of January tends to be one of the single busiest weeks of the year for new visits and sign ups. Once the deposit is made and the year long contract signed the new fitness visitor is now a club member.  By February they may not visit the club more than once a month for the rest of the year, if that.

The one change taking place now in the fitness club industry are the low cost, no long-term contract fitness clubs. If they continue to make inroads into the fitness club industry they may change the industry, however, the first week of January will still be a heavy use week for newly minted to working out people.

How do you really stay on track and achieve what you set out to do?

Let’s start with a slight shift in thinking. Let’s not call what we want to achieve aNew Year’s Resolution.  Let’s call what we are setting out to do “Setting Our Course For The Year”.  We will be setting goals. Here are the ways to make certain you achieve the goals you set.

1.   Set a very specific goal. This means you do not set a goal like this – “Lose Weight”

The goal might be – “Lose Twenty Pounds This Year”.

2.   Write down your specific goal.

3.   Let people close to you know about your goal and how important it is to you.

4.   Join a group or work with someone who will hold you accountable.

5.   Use any type of planning system you want and reel back the year long specific goal into monthly specific smaller goals toward achieving the year long big goal. Use dates.

For the weight loss goal the first month might state on January 31 – “weigh myself and see the two pounds I lost this month”.

Let me state here these steps apply to any type of goals. It is not only for the weight loss goal.  If your goal is “To Learn To Speak Spanish This Year”. What might your monthly goals look like?  Potentially you have purchased a course online and there are various sections.  If there are twenty four sections your smaller monthly goal might be to complete the next two sections each month in order to complete the course by the end of the year.

6.   Conduct an end of each month review for all of the goals you set and where you are in progressing toward the year long goal. Write down the progress. Write down the year long goal next to it.

7.   Determine every three months if you are really committed to each of your year long goals. Make adjustments if necessary. This may mean you need to reel back on your year long goal or it may mean expanding and aiming higher.

In summary, follow these seven steps and you will be more likely to achieve your goals than if you do not. Be the one next year who set their goals and achieved them!

Do you want more guidance and tips around setting goals and achieving your goals? Be on the lookout for an email invitation to a no cost call on “Setting Your Course For The Year” coming this month in January.  Not on the mailing list?  

CLICK HERE TO JOIN 

Mitch Tublin runs a boutique consulting firm with a main focus on Leadership and Communication Skill Enhancement, Business and Team Building, Executive Presence and Coaching. Based in Stamford, CT. Mitch partners with his clients to be their best all over the world.

Do you want one-on-one time working with Mitch to Set Your Course For The Year? Contact Mitch here.

Resolutions Without Resolve Will Not Get You Anywhere

NewYear2015Do you typically make a few New Year’s resolutions? It is widely known that over 50% of New Year’s resolutions are broken within the first seven days of the New Year. Another 50% of the remaining resolutions are broken by January 15 – meaning 75% of the brand new and created New Year’s resolutions are broken within the first two weeks and a day into the New Year.

What are we to learn from this information? Is it that most people do not know how to create a meaningful resolution? Is it that there is no accountability process to keep people on track for their resolutions? Are these possible reasons? Yes, of course. The reality is the majority of us – yes, all of us – do not embrace change. People do not embrace change. For change to become of importance the resultant benefit, value, or return on change – the ROC, the return on change – must be clearly defined, processed and internalized.

How can we prove this is true? What if you insist it is an accountability issue, and once accountability is put into place then resolutions will be kept? One example may be taken from one of the most popular personal New Year’s resolutions. This would be to lose weight and to get fit. The numbers speak for themselves. The highest spike in new memberships at health clubs and paid gym membership clubs is the period directly after New Year’s each and every year. Personal Trainers are hired and scheduled out during this period for anywhere from three weeks to three months of training one on one with new clients.

Let’s review – money has been spent which will most likely be charged monthly to a credit card. A personal trainer is paid a deposit or a full payment to meet with the new member for the next three months two or three times a week. Initially people will show up each day or three or four times a week. By the second week, they are skipping more days of working out. The trainer is sitting and waiting for the client and the client does not show up. The accountability is there and built into the system, yet people willingly are paying and simply not showing up.

Take this example now and let’s add in the buy in and the ROC, return on change, for one person. Let us say there was a heart incident. The personal physician for this person explains the life or death potential results unless diet and workout regimens are put into practice. Specific goals with timeframes are established. In this exact scenario more people will build upon their days at the new health club they joined. They will rarely miss an appointment with their personal trainer.

This example may seem dramatic to you. It does prove the point. One item to note, even in the case described, there is a measureable percentage of people who still will not show up! What else is missing?

It is something referenced as PITE, Personal Investment of Time and Effort, in my keynotes and work with clients. A person must be willing to personally invest their time and effort to effectively create change in anything they intend to create lasting change in.

Now consider for yourself, right now, what might you personally need to change?

Mitch Tublin is an advanced certified executive and personal coach who resides in Stamford, CT.

 

Just Get One Thing Accomplished

Image courtesy of Idea go / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Idea go / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It is early January and you cannot miss the blogs, magazine articles, news stories, and advice from those of all walks of life on the “Top Ways To…” insert whatever the particular New Year’s Resolution might be.

A few of the annual resolution topics are as follows:

  • weight loss
  • become more organized
  • save more money
  • stop smoking
  • better fitness and health
  • spend more time with family

Again and again these topics appear on the list as most often selected by the general population to resolve to achieve.  The reality is less than 10% of people ever achieve the resolutions they absolutely intend to!

There are numerous reasons why the failure rate is so high, here are a few:

  • too many resolutions are selected
  • lack of accountability
  • do not create a plan of action
  • fall into the regular routine
  • not keeping the change at top of mind

Here is a suggestion if you identify with this discussion in your business or personal life.

Why not select one specific item you wish to change or goal to obtain?

For example:

  • learn to speak a new language
  • complete a course or training in a skill
  • smile more often

These are examples, you should create your own. By identifying one specific thing to accomplish you will be way ahead of the game.

Next create a time-frame for when you wish to accomplish the goal.  For example: if the goal is to speak a new language, for the majority of people a time frame of one week would be too short a time frame. Therefore the time frame must be a realistic and achievable time frame for you.

Once the time frame is established create smaller steps or goals to accomplish along the way to completing the big goal. Each of these steps should have a time frame for achievement associated with it.

At this point an accountability process needs to be set up. This may be with another person who has a similar goal or with a professional coach. The failure to attach accountability to this process will likely lead to failure in achieving the goal.

Take the opportunity to try these easy steps and follow the process. Have fun along the road to your goal.

Mitch Tublin is an advanced certified executive and personal coach who resides in Stamford, CT.